22 Comments

  1. Penelope Silvers
    December 15, 2017 @ 2:27 am

    I’ve never traveled to this part of the world, and never heard of Goa. You’ve really given us a bird’s eye view of what it’s like there. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      December 15, 2017 @ 11:06 am

      I’m glad I could give you a new perspective Penelope. Thank you for commenting 🙂

      Reply

  2. Ryan Biddulph
    December 15, 2017 @ 8:00 am

    Interesting take here. We visited Kovalam Beach down the coast. Loved it. This had a different feel than the Goa I’ve been introduced to by my travel blogging buddies. I do love the backpack crowd but can do without the dirt bag crowd LOL. Of course, these seedy types are a tiny percentage of travelers but are usually the driver behind big government changes, like seen in Goa. Hopefully the place preserves its beauty and peace, while attracting the type of tourists that treat Goa and locals with respect too. Thanks for the insightful share.

    Ryan

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      December 15, 2017 @ 11:05 am

      Thanks for the comment Ryan. This is a global trend, unfortunately. 1) A few travellers find a new cool place. 2) It gets known for hedonism. 3) Travel bloggers and agents advertise the place aggressively. 4) Tourists that are too lazy to research follow the bandwagon. 5) The local players see the $$$ opportunity. 6) They try to make the place into a mass tourism place. 7) It becomes overcrowded and possibly polluted. 8) No one wants to go there except locals that think that the place still is what it was in the past.

      Reply

  3. Sanders
    September 13, 2018 @ 1:52 pm

    Spot on. Thanks for a very clear article. It’s very true. All I see around in Goa are the budget tourists from the north Indian cities turning this place into another Delhi, Lucknow or Gurgaon. There is not one creek or beach I didn’t see broken beer bottles or plastic floating around. Tourists in bus loads cooking beside the streets and defecating in the open is what I saw during the season. Of course, also no music festivals like sunburn as well because of the locals greed touching new heights…. We Indians have never known to keep a golden goose healthy.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      September 14, 2018 @ 11:57 am

      Thank you for your comment. As much as it hurts me as a person that visited Goa multiple times, I just had to write this article. Hope things get better like they used to be once upon a time 🙂

      Reply

  4. Sinjana Ghosh
    November 23, 2018 @ 8:19 pm

    Little disappointed to read this as i am visiting Goa for the first time in december (well not considering the 5-star office off-site). I can relate this to what people say and the thing about plastic bags floating around just boils my blood. Heard the same thing happening in the cleanest lake of india, Dawki in north east. This is an absolutely unacceptable behavior and the authorities should take stern action against this.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 24, 2018 @ 7:22 pm

      Thank you, Sinjana. It hurts me too but unfortunately, that’s the reality. Nevertheless, Goa still has an amazing nature and a few beautiful, crowd-free beaches and I hope you have a great time.

      Reply

  5. Leah
    November 24, 2018 @ 1:10 am

    You really provided fascinating information on Goa. I am not very familiar with this part of India but always wanted to visit. It is good to hear that Goa still has some beautiful beaches, but it is sad to hear from you how much it has changed over the years. With the crime increasing so much, I imagine that tourism will continue to drop in the area. Very sad, as it looks like a wonderful destination.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 24, 2018 @ 7:23 pm

      Thank you, Leah. That’s the sad reality but I hope things go back to normal again.

      Reply

  6. Navita
    November 24, 2018 @ 9:16 pm

    We were in Goa not so long ago for over 5 months starting from the carnival through the off-season. We managed to dodge the busy side of Goa that the post refers to, as we ventured just few kms east from the beaches and cherished the Sahyadri hills with many wildlife sanctuaries such as Netravali and ancient structures such as Tambdi Surla Shiva temple. Plus, we have fond memories from the protected beaches for Olive Ridley Turtles! Luckily, the bio-diverse wonderland continues to be a well-guarded reality, albeit away from the popular gaze. I hope you get to explore this side of Goa, beyond the hippie trail, on you next visit 🙂

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 25, 2018 @ 11:34 am

      I stayed in Goa for a month and I did explore part of Goa you mentioned as well and don’t get me wrong, Goa is still a gorgeous place. But my impression was that the government is trying to monetize as much of that beautiful nature as possible. And I hope I’m wrong but I think it’s only a matter of time when even the more pristine places will fall victim to this policy.

      Reply

  7. Paul
    November 25, 2018 @ 6:12 am

    It’s an interesting one. I certainly share your sentiment that it’s a shame it’s going the way it is, I’m just not sure we’re entitled to have places remain the way we as travellers want them. I can see why governments want to make more money out of popular spots, but doing it in a way that damages the environment and reason it was popular in the first place is counterproductive obviously. We also contribute to the problem as traveller bloggers who help bring focus to these places. But, it’s a shame. I never really saw Goa the way you describe it originally, so not sure what I’m missing. I did have to chuckle at the strategy of lowering alcohol to combat the drug problem! Great thoughtful read, thanks for sharing.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 25, 2018 @ 11:43 am

      Yes Paul, I could definitely understand why the government would want to make more money out of popular spots but it’s not happening. In this case, it’s counter-productive. They want to get rid of the foreign hippies and backpackers and replace them with luxury travelers. The thing is, Goa never was a luxury traveler destination and it takes a lot of time not only to change this but to reshape the environment and make it fit with that image. However, this reshaping is not good for the nature and environment, which is the main reason why most people visited there anywhere. The backpackers don’t feel that welcome in Goa anymore and hence, fewer of them still visit and the luxury travelers are nowhere to be found. What is currently happening is that the local government managed to effectively replace the international hippy budget backpackers with Indian budget backpackers, which makes it hard to justify all these changes from a financial point of view.

      Reply

  8. Clarice
    November 26, 2018 @ 8:37 pm

    I feel so sorry to hear this about Goa. I would have to agree that we should try to keep and make it a peaceful destination and not an abused beach. Hope they can find a solution to stop drugs and prostitution.

    This situation is very similar to Boracay a couple of months ago and glad that the government took the initiative to close it entirely for rehabilitation.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 27, 2018 @ 12:36 pm

      Thank you, Clarice. I wish the local authorities do something similar but they seem to be trying too much, unfortunately.

      Reply

  9. Aisha
    November 27, 2018 @ 11:48 am

    This post just broke my heart! I’m planning to return to India in early 2020 and Goa is at the top of my list because I never made it there during my last trip. To hear what has happened and continues to happen there saddens me, but I’ve seen happen elsewhere, where development isn’t handled properly and government’s become misdirected in their goals. I still intend to visit Goa and hope that things have somehow begun to turn around by the time I arrive. Thanks so much for sharing this perspective.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 27, 2018 @ 3:05 pm

      I stayed in India for more than a year and it feels like a home so it breaks my heart too. I hope things get better soon. And yes, you should definitely still visit. Goa is still beautiful

      Reply

  10. Manjulika Pramod
    November 27, 2018 @ 7:39 pm

    Mass tourism has indeed spoiled Goa but I would also say backpackers/hippies have a contribution to make. The moment a place becomes popular and easily accessible, it gets over crowded leading to the destruction of the sanctity of the place. I feel its important to keep a check on the tourists and their ways of littering the beaches. At the same time the old charm should not be compromised for development. For Indians, Goa is the go-to place for a beach holiday.

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 28, 2018 @ 10:53 am

      I absolutely agree with your points. The old charm should definitely not be compromised for development.

      Reply

  11. Bhushavali N
    November 30, 2018 @ 1:11 am

    Goa has such a charm! Indeed as Manjulika too said in her comment, mass tourism did damage the place.
    But then there is a large untapped section of Goa known for its secluded beaches, treks, heritage etc which are not so damaged.
    I’m yet to get there. Hoping to see what’s there apart from the crowded beaches that you mention here!

    Reply

    • dankiteski
      November 30, 2018 @ 11:43 am

      Indeed it does, Bhushavali! There are still lovely parts of Goa and I hope it remains that way.

      Reply

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